Breathe Easy – The Science Behind the Flair Equine Nasal Strips

FLAIR Nasal Strips are proven to make breathing easier. The strips are drug-free and adhere to a horse’s nose to provide a spring-like force that gently supports the nasal passages and reduces soft tissue collapse during exercise. There are no negative side effects to horses wearing the Strips. The Strips are scientifically proven to maintain nasal passage diameter, thus reducing airway resistance, EIPH, and fatigue. FLAIR Strips have also been proven to reduce the energy required for breathing which optimizes performance by shunting this saved energy to the locomotory muscles. Post- exercise recovery is shortened by allowing horses to ventilate and cool themselves more efficiently. The benefits of easier breathing are important for horses competing at all levels of fitness and skill, as exercise is often a greater challenge for individuals when they are less fit. Many riders report that horses wearing FLAIR Strips are more relaxed and focused. The FLAIR® Strip ultimately serves to improve the overall health of the horse.”

“At least eight studies have been conducted over the past decade to show exactly how nasal strips work, and there are more than a dozen publications that support the effectiveness of (nasal strips) in reducing exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.”

Some of the key findings of the aforementioned studies supporting the use of nasal strips for athletic horses include:

  • The strip has been shown to significantly decrease the “work” of breathing (as evidenced by decreased oxygen consumption);
  • Horses wearing a nasal strip have been found to have significantly decreased bleeding into the lungs (exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, or EIPH), compared to when they did not wear the strip; and
  • The improvement in EIPH when wearing strips was found to be equivalent to that noted when the same horses were treated with the diuretic furosemide (Salix), the current treatment of choice for EIPH.

Flair Strips are available at the Brandenburg’s Store.

Source Article:

http://www.thehorse.com/articles/29332/the-science-behind-equine-nasal-strips by Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc